2nd Saturday Artwalk October 12, 2019

Fall is supposedly in full swing, but we in the IE never pay mind to rules – even Nature’s rules. That means there’s still time to get out and enjoy the SoCal Second Summer and pop into the local hot spots to soak up what you missed during last month’s sweltering, as well as check out the all the new autumnal artistry in bloom!

In honor of the upcoming best holiday ever, the School of Arts and Enterprise (SAE) presents its annual “An Exhibition of Horror,” featuring the best of creaky, freaky, bump in the night works from their top student cadavers – I mean creators!

Progress Gallery dives into colors galore through the watercolor, acrylic and oil works of Ginger Lai, who is trained in the Sumi Ink medium and ingrains within her work the Western aesthetics of abstraction. Created by automatic and spontaneous repetitive markings, Lai’s goal is to uplift and remind that what is temporary can, in fact, become permanent.

Ginger Lai, Progress Gallery

Ginger Lai, Progress Gallery

Ginger Lai, Progress Gallery

Ginger Lai, Progress Gallery

Latino Art Museum opens a solo show by Mati Russo, “Global Warming,” and continues its group show, “Mes de la Hispanidad,” celebrating Hispanic heritage with works from artists Aura Suarez, Carmen Teal, Daniel Quinionez, David Orion Blanco, Eduardo Medrano, Edwin Vasquez, Enrique Espinoza, Hernando Carrizosa, Iris Vodopivec, Juan Solis, Kat Gaddis, Trevino, Marcos Dorado/Lupe Lopez, Marisol de las Casas, Marthe Aponte, Mati Russo, Rebecca Nabarrete, Roy Poma, Silvia Woboril, Terry Cervantes, Valeria Marchio, Warren Scherich and Enrico Mario Santi. 

Mati Russo,  Mixed media on wood, LAM

Mati Russo, Mixed media on wood, LAM

57 Underground continues Jeanne Anderson’s exploration of our environment through abstraction and color in “Our Own Genocide,” a collection of work that calls-out the human drive toward self-extinction through disastrous climate denial and endless excavation of our natural resources. Focusing on the machines that strip our lands to create an epidemic of consumption and commerce, Anderson attempts to call more attention to the destruction and spur discourse around possible solutions.

Jeanne Anderson, 57 Underground

Jeanne Anderson, 57 Underground

Metro Gallery also continues last month show of works from Guatemalan-born digital artist Edwin Vasquez in “Refractions,” featuring a host of “new media” abstractions inspired by mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot, who pioneered the mathematical analysis of chaos and complex systems, and digital artist Dr. Brian Rutenberg. Using vibrant colors, Vasquez’s mix-media fractals embody the idea of “viewing the whole” to explore shapes in a poetic, minimalist scale.

Edwin R. Vasquez, Metro Gallery

Edwin R. Vasquez, Metro Gallery

Edwin R. Vasquez, Metro Gallery

Edwin R. Vasquez, Metro Gallery

Likewise, the dA Center for the Arts continues “16th Annual d'Aztlan: El Movimiento,” a showcase of all that is d’Aztlan, offering a multifaceted celebration of the art, tradition, culture, and stories of the Chicano in a contemporary context. Calling for simultaneous renewal and innovation, this large group show honors legacies of Aztlan and hopes to ignite more dialogue around issues that affect Chicano communities.

-Stacy Davies

The dA Center for the Arts

The dA Center for the Arts