2nd Saturday Artwalk February 10, 2018

Although January felt like it was 87 days long and flew by in about 20 minutes – February promises a month filled with worthy distractions to anchor your time, such as Black History Month, Rosa Parks Day, Susan B. Anthony’s Birthday, and, of course, Valentine’s Day.

Before the Church appropriated the day and rechristened it for Saint Valentine, Valentine’s Day was a pagan celebration of fertility in which women were slapped on the backside with bloodied goat hides to aid in their fallopian frenzy. Today, of course, the slap comes on your credit card statement after myriad couples drop hundreds of dollars in an effort to prove their devotion (to their beloved, or at least to their Facebook team) – and the ceremonial color for this consumer chaos is, of course, red. 

That means the da Center for the Arts’ annual “Red Show” opens in the downtown, offering a cornucopia of interpretations of the hue and all it represents. 57 Underground embarks on a similarly titled companion show in the dA basement, featuring works by Desiree Engel, Doug Ward, Karen Duckles, Oscar Leal and others.

 Oscar Leal, Mother's Eyes, Acrylic on canvas, 20 x 17,  57 Underground

Oscar Leal, Mother's Eyes, Acrylic on canvas, 20 x 17, 
57 Underground

 Desiree Engel, Pomegranate, Ceramic, 57 Underground

Desiree Engel, Pomegranate, Ceramic, 57 Underground

 Karen Duckles, Pink Flower, Oil on Canvas, 24 x 30, 57 Underground

Karen Duckles, Pink Flower, Oil on Canvas, 24 x 30, 57 Underground

The Latino Art Museum had  zero time for Valentine’s Day, however, and instead celebrates Mardi Gras, which falls on the day before VD this year, and sounds like a much better party. “Mardi Gras in Pomona,” curated by Dulce Stein, features wild and wacky masks and paintings by Viktoria Romanova, Claudia Cogo, Therese Verner, Kenny Altamirano, Rudy Torres, Ondria Rees, Nirali Thakker, and Carolina Garino-Tabit, with live music during the opening reception by David Holguin and Nelson Alberquenque, as well as foods native to New Orleans. Also, in the main salon, artworks by Peruvian artist Enech Maldonado are featured in “Reflejos del Interio.”

  Alex S. Arizpe III, Installation, LAM

 Alex S. Arizpe III, Installation, LAM

 Claudia Cogo, A El Soy una Mascara, Acrylic on canvas, 17 x 12, LAM

Claudia Cogo, A El Soy una Mascara, Acrylic on canvas, 17 x 12, LAM

 
 Ondria Rees, The Joker, Acrylic on board, 12 x 17, LAM

Ondria Rees, The Joker, Acrylic on board, 12 x 17, LAM

The SAE’s Gallery at the Downtown Center branches out into nature with their “Middle School Spring Showcase,” in which students under the instruction of Mark Bunner present work with naturalistic themes and elements, and students working under Digital Media Arts instructor Bertha Aguilar-Garcia exhibit photography and illustration with an emphasis on light manipulated through long exposure.

 SAE Gallery

SAE Gallery

 SAE Gallery

SAE Gallery

 SAE Gallery

SAE Gallery

Progress Gallery offers “Polymorphic Experiences,” a duo show by Sharon Ye and Mayra Villegas that explores relationships and connections that deal with social encounter, relationship with the self, and feelings and perspectives that reflect universal incidents and emotions.

Metro Gallery goes “B-A-N-A-N-A-S!” with illustrator and designer Alex Torrez’s homage to pop culture and pop art – with a modern twist. Featuring drawings created from stippling and ink, Torrez’s monochromatic images are detailed in technique and bold in subject matter, reflecting youthful nostaligia, love of history and music, and a hunger for life.

 Alex Torrez, Dole44, Metro Gallery

Alex Torrez, Dole44, Metro Gallery

 Alex Torrez, Great Yella, Metro Gallery

Alex Torrez, Great Yella, Metro Gallery

The AMOCA (American Museum of Ceramic Art) continues Patsy Cox’s “Mouthpiece,” a new body of work that celebrates diversity and reveals the compelling times in which we live. The work, literally a collective assembly of mouths biting their lips without voice or sound in frustration and angst, attempts to capture a personal reaction that is all encompassing and visceral. The museum also continues the exhibits  “Plunder Me, Baby,” the first West Coast exhibition by Peruvian artist Kukuli Velarde; “We the People: Serving Notice,” an examination of themes of political divide, immigration, equality, gender and sexuality, racial injustice, money and power, the current administration, the environment, and war; and “Mettlach: Folklore & Fairy Tales.”

                                                                                                  -Stacy Davies

  Hope Rovelto - You really need to vote next time., 2017, porcelain, screen printing, AMOCA

 Hope Rovelto - You really need to vote next time., 2017, porcelain, screen printing, AMOCA

 Kukuli Velardes - India Patarrajada, She will do all the acrobacies the Master orders, Mexico. 1200-800 BC, 2008, White clay, wax casien paint, resin, AMOCA

Kukuli Velardes - India Patarrajada, She will do all the acrobacies the Master orders, Mexico. 1200-800 BC, 2008, White clay, wax casien paint, resin, AMOCA

 Joan Takayama Ogawa - Sushi, America's Fast Food, AMOCA

Joan Takayama Ogawa - Sushi, America's Fast Food, AMOCA

 Patsy Cox, Untitled, 2017, colored porcelain, AMOCA

Patsy Cox, Untitled, 2017, colored porcelain, AMOCA