2nd Saturday Artwalk April 2018


Art is in bloom as the Downtown bursts forth with a host of new exhibitions from a diverse group of visionary creators. 
Kicking off on Art Walk night, Metro Gallery welcomes Daily Bulletin columnist David Allen, who’ll be reading from his two books, Pomona A to Z and Getting Started, sharing experiences and anecdotes and answering questions from the audience. Allen will also be signing books, and light refreshments will be served. 

 Christian Thompson, "Untitled", Lofton2nd

Christian Thompson, "Untitled", Lofton2nd

LOFTon2nd presents “LOTUS Creative Experience,” curated by Disney design artist Christian Thompson and featuring work from Thompson and his colleagues that experiment with digital design, color, and photography that invites onlookers into the life of a not-so-glamorous creative world.

The Latino Art Museum opens two shows. The Main Salon presents the solo work of muralist and digital photographic artist Guillermo Bejarano, whose paintings are influenced by American Post-Expressionism and the Mexican School of Art (mural tradition) in Mexico City. Diving deep into abstraction, Bejarano’s paintings center on the transformation, transfiguring, and transporting of energy and beauty throughout the universe, a creation aspect that directly feeds into the Mayan philosophical concept about one’s own creativity or existence as manifested through art.

 Guillermo Bejarano,  "Cinco Mandos", Latino Art Museum

Guillermo Bejarano,  "Cinco Mandos", Latino Art Museum

 Guillermo Bejarano, "Earth Maiden III", Latino Art Museum

Guillermo Bejarano, "Earth Maiden III", Latino Art Museum

The Grand Salon West and Main Salon South feature exhibitions from Spain, as well as the “International Collection,” curated by Diana Moya and Gorgonio Sanjuan that presents the work of 50 artists from all over Europe.

 Alicia Rubio, Latino Art Museum 

Alicia Rubio, Latino Art Museum 

 Emilio Romero, Latino Art Museum

Emilio Romero, Latino Art Museum

 Fran Berrago, Latino Art Museum

Fran Berrago, Latino Art Museum

 Francana, Latino Art Museum

Francana, Latino Art Museum

57 Underground offers you a “Bail Out!!” – a group show featuring works from Jeanne Anderson, Karen Duckles, Georgia Garside,  Susan Ilsey, Ken Johnson, Mervyn Seldon, Chris Toovey, DA Ward, Yi-li Chin Ward, and Peter Zou who use everything from found objects to Confucianism to re-imagined classic movie collages to tell the stories of primal nature, industrialized societies, and humanity. 

 Karen Duckles, "Inside the Box", 57 Underground

Karen Duckles, "Inside the Box", 57 Underground

 DA Ward, "Dorothy's Choice", 57 Underground

DA Ward, "Dorothy's Choice", 57 Underground

 Peter Zhou, "China Town Ball Out", 57 Underground

Peter Zhou, "China Town Ball Out", 57 Underground

Progress Gallery welcomes Joe Ded (Joe Walsh) for the solo show “Transmission 57,” a series of works that explore the concept that human bodies are the transmitters of signals from unknown dimensions. According to Ded, the number five symbolizes man and the number seven is the divine number of completeness. Ded’s work is a blend of street art, abstract expressionism and art deco styles, and keep the subject matter playful and filled with hints of pop culture references. 

 Joe Ded, "Dance of Death Alphabet", 10 x 10

Joe Ded, "Dance of Death Alphabet", 10 x 10

 Joe Ded, "Fire Ants Walk With Me" 36 x 36, Progress Gallery

Joe Ded, "Fire Ants Walk With Me" 36 x 36, Progress Gallery

Also on display, the School of Arts and Enterprise (SAE) presents their annual AP Visual and Digital Arts Exhibition, featuring works from 22 advanced-placement art students who have all been accepted into four-year colleges or private universities – half of them on scholarship.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                             -Stacy Davies

 
 

Here's How Pomona's Downtown will get a little safer

 

By LISET MARQUEZ | lmarquez@scng.com | Inland Valley Daily Bulletin
PUBLISHED: March 24, 2018 at 10:00 am | UPDATED: March 24, 2018 at 11:21 am

Pomona leaders have signed off on a pact which will allow the addition of 15 cameras to be installed onto city street light poles in the downtown area.

Under the terms of the agreement, Pomona will not charge the area’s business improvement district, Downtown Pomona Owners Association, to use the poles. The association taxes itself to raise money for improvements in the downtown area.

“It is (the association’s) goal to make sure the security they are providing is adequate for the patrolling of the downtown and the services they provide,” said Councilwoman Adriana Robledo, who sits on the DPOA board along with Councilman Rubio Gonzalez.

The agreement, which was unanimously approved at the March 19 City Council meeting, is part of the association’s ongoing effort to deter crime downtown.

The association first installed security cameras 10 years ago and has 56 cameras in the city’s core, said Carolyn Hemming, president of the Downtown Pomona Owners Association Board of Directors. The association spends $50,000 a year operating and maintaining the equipment, she said.

The DPOA’s existing security cameras are installed on Garey Avenue, Main Street and Second Street, according to a staff report to the council. Most of those cameras have been hardwired, while the new cameras will be wireless.

“This will help us have the height and line of sight that we need covered,” she said.

In June 2016, the City Council set aside $26,000 from the Vehicle Parking District budget to the DPOA for the installation of security surveillance cameras. The association can tap into those funds if the equipment is located in lots within the parking district of the downtown.

As is the case with the existing cameras, Pomona police will have unfettered access to the feeds, Hemming said. Officers who patrol the area access the feeds from mobile apps, and the department’s watch commander can also monitor the feeds, she said.

“For the officers, it helps them out if they’re in on area of downtown, but they are still able to keep an eye on another of the downtown,” Hemming said.

The association has the ability to download and save any of the feeds, she said.

 

 

 

 

 

UPDATE: Services for Fallen Officer Greggory Casillas

Officer Greggory Casillas.jpg

Funeral Services
Services for Pomona Police Officer Greggory Casillas will be on Thursday, March 22nd at 9:30am at Purpose Church- 601 N. Garey Ave. Pomona. Church doors will open to the public at 8:30am.
 
Procession Route
Immediately following the service will be an emergency vehicle procession. The route of the procession will go as follows, southbound Garey Ave. to Mission Blvd., westbound Mission Blvd. to White Ave., northbound White Ave. to IS-10, westbound I-10 to Via Verde, exit Via Verde southbound into Forest Lawn Covina Hills.
 
Street Closures
Street closures beginning at 6:00am on March 22nd will be:

  • Garey Ave. in both directions from Holt Ave. (near Purpose Church) to Alvarado St. This street closure could extend as high as Orange Grove Ave.
  • Main St. from Holt Ave. to Pearl St.
  • Pearl St. from east on Main St. to Garey Ave.  

** Please consider alternate routes around this area.**
 
Guest Entrance
ALL arriving vehicles should enter southbound on Garey Ave. at Orange Grove Ave.
 
General Parking
General parking will be available in the parking lot located on the northwest corner of Garey Ave. and Pearl St.
 
Outside Agency/Emergency Vehicle Parking
Outside police agencies/emergency vehicles who plan on participating in the procession should park their vehicle on Garey Ave. facing south in the northbound #1 and northbound #2 lanes.  
 
Emergency vehicles not participating in the procession are to park in the general parking lot.
 
Chiefs of Police and Dignitary Parking
 Chiefs of Police and Dignitaries will be directed to the church parking lot south of Pearl St.  
 
Live Streaming
Live streaming of the funeral service will be available on these social media platforms:

  • Pomona PD Facebook- @Pomona Police Department
  • Purpose Church Facebook- @Purpose Church Pomona
  • ABC7 Facebook- @ABC7

Police agencies from across LA County will assist with police services within the City of Pomona. These agencies are part of the established LA County Area-D Mutual Aid structure and their assistance will allow for Pomona police employees to attend the funeral. During this deployment, there will not be any interruption in emergency service delivery to the community. The front desk of the police station will be closed throughout the day.

2nd Saturday Artwalk March 10, 2018

The Mayans called the first day of spring, or vernal equinox, “the return of the sun serpent,” due to the sun’s exotic light patterns that formed on the Chichen Itza temple, still located in modern day Mexico, on that particular day – usually around March 20. Likewise, from the ancient Babylonians to the modern Iranians, the vernal equinox is an essential maker – the starting point for their calendars – and in Jewish tradition, Passover is celebrated at the equinox. In the Christian tradition, Easter follows the equinox in short measure, and in Annapolis, Maryland, they celebrate the arrival of spring with The Burning of the Socks Day, indicating fishermen no longer need to bundle up their tootsies thanks to the coming spring warmth. 

For most Americans, however, March 20 is still a recouperation day, since St. Paddy’s is on the 17th and just about every American thinks he or she is some part Irish. Downtown Pomona embraces these and a multitude of celebrations and even rolls its own, exploring and uplifting the budding visions and expressions of artists both local and international.

AMOCA (American Museum of Ceramic Art) gets out in front this month with “Fahrenheit 2018,” an inaugural biennial featuring 80 artworks from ceramists from all over the world, and juried by renowned ceramic artist Patti Warashina. The show doesn’t have a theme, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t messages aplenty among these various sculptural, functional, and figurative works. Each piece represents the excellence and diversity of ceramic art from the US, Denmark, Brazil, and France, among other regions, and promises to ignite both the imagination and the inspiration.

AMOCA also continues its previous exhibitions “We the People: Serving Notice”; “Patsy Cox: Mouthpiece”; and “Mettlach: Folklore & Fairy Tales.”

 Elliott Kayser, AMOCA

Elliott Kayser, AMOCA

 Mimi Logothetis, AMOCA

Mimi Logothetis, AMOCA

 Robbie Heidinger, AMOCA

Robbie Heidinger, AMOCA

 Marina Kuchinski, AMOCA

Marina Kuchinski, AMOCA

 Juliette Clovis, AMOCA

Juliette Clovis, AMOCA

57 Underground invites you to experience their “Life Force,” a duo show from Karen Duckles and Sharon Algozer. Duckles’ paintings were inspired by nature and its rapturous vitality, celebrating life and renewal, while Algozer’s work was inspired by a trip to Greece where she viewed paintings of octopi, an experience she injects into her exploration of harnessing the energy of the sea in the world of man.

 Karen Duckles, 57 Underground

Karen Duckles, 57 Underground

 Sharon Algozer, 57 Underground

Sharon Algozer, 57 Underground

The Latino Art Museum features a solo show, “Fire and Diversity,” from Charisse Abellana (and curated by Dulce Stein) in the Grand Salon West, and also celebrates women in their “14th Annual Women International Show: My Desire for the World,” which includes various artists from all over the globe, including Claudia Cogo, Marthe Aponte, Terry Cervantes, Alma Moctezuma, Naty Medina, Shrinidhi Kumar, Therese Verner, Viktoria Romanova, Silvia Garcia, Mati Russo, Rosa Elena Osicka, Curtis Gutierrez, Carmen Teal, Lina Garcia, Cherie Redlinger, Sabine Meyer Zu Reckendorf, Diana Moya, Beatriz Hidalgo de la Garza, Charisse Abellana, Su Horne, Victoria Muniagurria, Silvina Fernandez, Alma Grondona, Tere Liberati, Roberto Rodriguez, Carolina Garino-Tabit, Elizabeth Sides-Preston, and Ayumi Dickson. They’ll also be honoring their Women of the Year 2018: artist Yolanda Londoño and business woman Dulce Stein.

 Silvia Garcia, The Latino Art Museum

Silvia Garcia, The Latino Art Museum

 Tere Liberati, The Latino Art Museum

Tere Liberati, The Latino Art Museum

 Carolina Garino-Tabit, The Latino Art Museum

Carolina Garino-Tabit, The Latino Art Museum

Progress Gallery presents “Anthro-Obscene,” an exhibition from the Inland Empire artist collective Group 483, who aim to explore the detrimental effects of humans on environmental, social and cultural events and issues in the IE, and seeks to advance a dialogue about human influence over our surroundings. Alongside the exhibition, Group 483 will host a discussion panel in which they address the meaning and purpose of their work.

                                                                                                                         

 Cynthia Camacho, The Progress Gallery

Cynthia Camacho, The Progress Gallery

 Frank Perez, The Progress Gallery

Frank Perez, The Progress Gallery

Metro Gallery shines a spotlight on “intuitive” painter Shellise Berry in “Divine Design,” and the SAE (School of Art and Enterprise) presents its “Spring Visual and Digital Exhibition,” featuring artwork from their high school students.

                                                                                            -Stacy Davies

 Shellise Berry, Metro Gallery

Shellise Berry, Metro Gallery

 J. Sawyer, The Gallery at the Downtown Center

J. Sawyer, The Gallery at the Downtown Center

 Sam Vela, The Gallery at the Downtown Center

Sam Vela, The Gallery at the Downtown Center

Free Trolley Rides

Trolley-JITT-2.jpg

This Saturday and Sunday, February 24-25, catch a ride on our Trolley from the Fairplex to Downtown Pomona's Antique row during the Junk in the Trunk Vintage Market Event. If you love vintage shopping this is great opportunity to explore what Downtown Pomona has to offer. The first pick up from the Fairplex is at noon and the last trip back to the Fairplex is at 6pm. Sunday is also the Downtown Pomona Farmers Market from 10am-2pm. Happy Shopping Everyone!

#DowntownPomona #Antiquerow #Shopdowntownpomona #Fairplex#Junkinthetrunkvintagemarket #trolleyrides #Vintage

Farmers Market! Sunday, February 25, 10am-2pm

We are thrilled to announce the Pomona Harvest Certified Farmers Market. The market will take place every Sunday on the corner of Garey and 2nd St. from 10am-2pm in Downtown Pomona.  You can expect fresh locally grown fruit, veggies, eggs, citrus, honey, artisanal goods and local eats. Hope to see you there.

#DowntownPomona #Farmersmarket #community#shopdowntownpomona #organic #smallfarms

Downtown Farmers Market.JPG

2nd Saturday Artwalk February 10, 2018

Although January felt like it was 87 days long and flew by in about 20 minutes – February promises a month filled with worthy distractions to anchor your time, such as Black History Month, Rosa Parks Day, Susan B. Anthony’s Birthday, and, of course, Valentine’s Day.

Before the Church appropriated the day and rechristened it for Saint Valentine, Valentine’s Day was a pagan celebration of fertility in which women were slapped on the backside with bloodied goat hides to aid in their fallopian frenzy. Today, of course, the slap comes on your credit card statement after myriad couples drop hundreds of dollars in an effort to prove their devotion (to their beloved, or at least to their Facebook team) – and the ceremonial color for this consumer chaos is, of course, red. 

That means the da Center for the Arts’ annual “Red Show” opens in the downtown, offering a cornucopia of interpretations of the hue and all it represents. 57 Underground embarks on a similarly titled companion show in the dA basement, featuring works by Desiree Engel, Doug Ward, Karen Duckles, Oscar Leal and others.

 Oscar Leal, Mother's Eyes, Acrylic on canvas, 20 x 17,  57 Underground

Oscar Leal, Mother's Eyes, Acrylic on canvas, 20 x 17, 
57 Underground

 Desiree Engel, Pomegranate, Ceramic, 57 Underground

Desiree Engel, Pomegranate, Ceramic, 57 Underground

 Karen Duckles, Pink Flower, Oil on Canvas, 24 x 30, 57 Underground

Karen Duckles, Pink Flower, Oil on Canvas, 24 x 30, 57 Underground

The Latino Art Museum had  zero time for Valentine’s Day, however, and instead celebrates Mardi Gras, which falls on the day before VD this year, and sounds like a much better party. “Mardi Gras in Pomona,” curated by Dulce Stein, features wild and wacky masks and paintings by Viktoria Romanova, Claudia Cogo, Therese Verner, Kenny Altamirano, Rudy Torres, Ondria Rees, Nirali Thakker, and Carolina Garino-Tabit, with live music during the opening reception by David Holguin and Nelson Alberquenque, as well as foods native to New Orleans. Also, in the main salon, artworks by Peruvian artist Enech Maldonado are featured in “Reflejos del Interio.”

  Alex S. Arizpe III, Installation, LAM

 Alex S. Arizpe III, Installation, LAM

 Claudia Cogo, A El Soy una Mascara, Acrylic on canvas, 17 x 12, LAM

Claudia Cogo, A El Soy una Mascara, Acrylic on canvas, 17 x 12, LAM

 
 Ondria Rees, The Joker, Acrylic on board, 12 x 17, LAM

Ondria Rees, The Joker, Acrylic on board, 12 x 17, LAM

The SAE’s Gallery at the Downtown Center branches out into nature with their “Middle School Spring Showcase,” in which students under the instruction of Mark Bunner present work with naturalistic themes and elements, and students working under Digital Media Arts instructor Bertha Aguilar-Garcia exhibit photography and illustration with an emphasis on light manipulated through long exposure.

 SAE Gallery

SAE Gallery

 SAE Gallery

SAE Gallery

 SAE Gallery

SAE Gallery

Progress Gallery offers “Polymorphic Experiences,” a duo show by Sharon Ye and Mayra Villegas that explores relationships and connections that deal with social encounter, relationship with the self, and feelings and perspectives that reflect universal incidents and emotions.

Metro Gallery goes “B-A-N-A-N-A-S!” with illustrator and designer Alex Torrez’s homage to pop culture and pop art – with a modern twist. Featuring drawings created from stippling and ink, Torrez’s monochromatic images are detailed in technique and bold in subject matter, reflecting youthful nostaligia, love of history and music, and a hunger for life.

 Alex Torrez, Dole44, Metro Gallery

Alex Torrez, Dole44, Metro Gallery

 Alex Torrez, Great Yella, Metro Gallery

Alex Torrez, Great Yella, Metro Gallery

The AMOCA (American Museum of Ceramic Art) continues Patsy Cox’s “Mouthpiece,” a new body of work that celebrates diversity and reveals the compelling times in which we live. The work, literally a collective assembly of mouths biting their lips without voice or sound in frustration and angst, attempts to capture a personal reaction that is all encompassing and visceral. The museum also continues the exhibits  “Plunder Me, Baby,” the first West Coast exhibition by Peruvian artist Kukuli Velarde; “We the People: Serving Notice,” an examination of themes of political divide, immigration, equality, gender and sexuality, racial injustice, money and power, the current administration, the environment, and war; and “Mettlach: Folklore & Fairy Tales.”

                                                                                                  -Stacy Davies

  Hope Rovelto - You really need to vote next time., 2017, porcelain, screen printing, AMOCA

 Hope Rovelto - You really need to vote next time., 2017, porcelain, screen printing, AMOCA

 Kukuli Velardes - India Patarrajada, She will do all the acrobacies the Master orders, Mexico. 1200-800 BC, 2008, White clay, wax casien paint, resin, AMOCA

Kukuli Velardes - India Patarrajada, She will do all the acrobacies the Master orders, Mexico. 1200-800 BC, 2008, White clay, wax casien paint, resin, AMOCA

 Joan Takayama Ogawa - Sushi, America's Fast Food, AMOCA

Joan Takayama Ogawa - Sushi, America's Fast Food, AMOCA

 Patsy Cox, Untitled, 2017, colored porcelain, AMOCA

Patsy Cox, Untitled, 2017, colored porcelain, AMOCA

Congratulations Augusto Vivanco!

DPOA Maintenance Supervisor Augusto Vivanco obtains U.S. Citizenship. Congratulations all around from the DPOA Board of Directors, community members, and Pomona City Council members Adriana Robledo and Rubio Gonzales.  Certificates of appreciation from Congresswoman Norma Torres, State Senator Connie Leva,  Assembly Member Freddie Rodriguez,  and Pomona Mayor and City Council were presented. 

Street Closures

 A friendly announcement. There will be filming in Downtown Pomona this weekend. Beware of No Parking signage & Street closures on:

Friday January 26: Restricted Parking on Lot 12 behind Big D's Burgers due filming.

Saturday January 27: East 3rd Street at Garey Ave and Locust.

Sunday January 28: Temporary Closures of Garey Ave between 2nd and 4th Street. Traffic flow will be allowed between filming sequences. Closures of East and West 2nd Street 150 feet from the intersection of Garey Ave. Closures of East and West 4th Street 150 feet from the intersection of Garey Ave.

road closed.jpg

2nd Saturday Art Walk January 2018

The New Year is upon us, and with it comes new adventures in sight, sound, and exploration. If you can’t afford the plane fare until you get your new yuge tax break, however, just pop on over to the Pomona Art Walk and get the same experience – without a travel ban or having to remove your shoes.

57 Underground kicks off the new year with “Home Grown: Revisiting Roots,” a duo show by Kendall Johnson and Desiree Engle. Engle, one of the founders and member emeritus of Gallery 57, stretches the limits of clay, using it to explore the connections of day to day life with a focus on the earth from which it arose. Johnson’s work includes paintings and writings selected from his recently completed series “Back to Modern,” which focuses on the aesthetics of mid-century modern painting featured prominently in the art produced in the Claremont area during the 50s and 60s – and, together, the artists seek to promote grounding in a tumultuous time. 


AMOCA (American Museum of Ceramic Art) opens Patsy Cox’s “Mouthpiece,” a new body of work that celebrates diversity and reveals the compelling times in which we live. The work, literally a collective assembly of mouths biting their lips without voice or sound in frustration and angst, has been created since January 20, 2017 and attempts to capture a personal reaction that is all encompassing and visceral. Mouthpiece responds to a constant upheaval of long-accepted American values and morals that have embraced civil and constitutional rights and comes from a place of shock, confusion, and contradiction. It is a retort to the changes in our long held ideals of freedom and liberty.

AMOCA also continues its exhibitions “Plunder Me, Baby,” the first West Coast exhibition by Peruvian artist Kukuli Velarde; “We the People: Serving Notice,” an examination of themes of political divide, immigration, equality, gender and sexuality, racial injustice, money and power, the current administration, the environment, and war; and “Mettlach: Folklore & Fairy Tales.”


The Latino Art Museum, in conjunction with LOGCinema, presents Art Films Festival, featuring almost two dozen short films from all over the world. The museum also continues their exhibition “Angels in Pomona,” which includes work from Alma Moctezuma, Alejandro Navia, Rosa Elena Osicka, Claudia Cogo, Claudia Cox, Beatriz Hidalgo de la Garza, Jose Angel Hernandez, Gloria Montelongo, Ayuki Dickson, and Tymian Williams; and in their Grand Salon West, they unveil additions to their Chicano permanent collection donated by the Kevin Peron Family. The museum also continues its fundraising efforts for artist Susana Diaz Rivera.


“Hidden Messages” from artists Keith M. Klingonsmith and Stephen Rusher takes over the Progress Gallery, and it might be a slightly controversial show since the exhibition statement repeatedly tells us that the content is definitely only a representation of the artists’ experiences (in spirituality and religion?) and no one else’s, and the artists don’t claim to be experts or virtuous. Hmmm…what was it that Queen Gertrude said? We’re intrigued!


The Alley Gallery presents “Stippling,” by pointillism artist Christian Sarabia, as well as murals by Joe Ded, the Metro Gallery continues its show “Places and Faces” by Joey Martinez, and the dA Center for the Arts continues its 15th Annual exhibit, “Aztlan: A Sense of Place,” a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. Co-Curators: Frank Garcia and Margaret Garcia have corralled artists, tinkers, thinkers, engineers, and urban planners who construct creative solutions and express voices of concern for our inherited and future, with works by Leigh Adams, David Botello, Art Carrillo, Jimmy Centeno, Margaret Garcia, Mario Guerrero, Wayne Healy, Naiche Lujan, Heather McLarty, Cathi Miligan, Frank Romero, Nancy Romero, Marc Salazar, Mario Trillo, Ivan Deavy Zapien, and others. 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                -Stacy Davies